Optimizing Fonts

@next/font will automatically optimize your fonts (including custom fonts) and remove external network requests for improved privacy and performance.

This feature works both in the app and pages directories. This page goes through how to use it in app. To learn how to use in pages, please refer to the stable docs.

ğŸŽ¥ Watch: Learn more about how to use @next/font → YouTube (6 minutes).

Overview

@next/font includes built-in automatic self-hosting for any font file. This means you can optimally load web fonts with zero layout shift, thanks to the underlying CSS size-adjust property used.

This new font system also allows you to conveniently use all Google Fonts with performance and privacy in mind. CSS and font files are downloaded at build time and self-hosted with the rest of your static assets. No requests are sent to Google by the browser.

Usage

To get started, install @next/font:

npm install @next/font

Google Fonts

Automatically self-host any Google Font. Fonts are included in the deployment and served from the same domain as your deployment. No requests are sent to Google by the browser.

Import the font you would like to use from @next/font/google as a function. We recommend using variable fonts for the best performance and flexibility.

app/layout.tsx
import { Inter } from '@next/font/google';

// If loading a variable font, you don't need to specify the font weight
const inter = Inter({ subsets: ['latin'] })

export default function RootLayout({ children }: {
  children: React.ReactNode;
}) {
  return (
    <html lang="en" className={inter.className}>
      <body>{children}</body>
    </html>
  );
}

If you can't use a variable font, you will need to specify a weight:

app/layout.tsx
import { Roboto } from '@next/font/google';

const roboto = Roboto({
  weight: '400',
  subsets: ['latin'],
})

export default function RootLayout({ children }: {
  children: React.ReactNode;
}) {
  return (
    <html lang="en" className={roboto.className}>
      <body>{children}</body>
    </html>
  );
}

You can specify multiple weights and/or styles by using an array:

const roboto = Roboto({
  weight: ['400', '700'],
  style: ['normal', 'italic'],
  subsets: ['latin'],
});

Specifying a subset

Google Fonts are automatically subset. This reduces the size of the font file and improves performance. You'll need to define which of these subsets you want to preload. Failing to specify any subsets while preload is true will result in a warning.

This can be done in 2 ways:

  • On a font per font basis by adding it to the function call

    app/layout.tsx
    const inter = Inter({ subsets: ["latin"] });
    
  • Globally for all your fonts in your next.config.js

    next.config.js
    module.exports = {
      experimental: {
        fontLoaders: [
          { loader: '@next/font/google', options: { subsets: ['latin'] } },
        ],
      },
    };
    
    • If both are configured, the subset in the function call is used.

View the Font API Reference for more information.

Local Fonts

Import @next/font/local and specify the src of your local font file. We recommend using variable fonts for the best performance and flexibility.

app/layout.tsx
import localFont from '@next/font/local';

// Font files can be colocated inside of `app`
const myFont = localFont({ src: './my-font.woff2' });

export default function RootLayout({ children }: {
  children: React.ReactNode;
}) {
  return (
    <html lang="en" className={myFont.className}>
      <body>{children}</body>
    </html>
  );
}

If you want to use multiple files for a single font family, src can be an array:

const roboto = localFont({
  src: [
    {
      path: './Roboto-Regular.woff2',
      weight: '400',
      style: 'normal',
    },
    {
      path: './Roboto-Italic.woff2',
      weight: '400',
      style: 'italic',
    },
    {
      path: './Roboto-Bold.woff2',
      weight: '700',
      style: 'normal',
    },
    {
      path: './Roboto-BoldItalic.woff2',
      weight: '700',
      style: 'italic',
    },
  ],
});

View the Font API Reference for more information.

With Tailwind CSS

@next/font can be used with Tailwind CSS through a CSS variable.

In the example below, we use the font Inter from @next/font/google (you can use any font from Google or Local Fonts). Load your font with the variable option to define your CSS variable name and assign it to inter. Then, use inter.variable to add the CSS variable to your HTML document.

app/layout.tsx
import { Inter } from '@next/font/google';

const inter = Inter({
  variable: '--font-inter',
});

export default function RootLayout({ children }: {
  children: React.ReactNode;
}) {
  return (
    <html lang="en" className={inter.variable}>
      <body>{children}</body>
    </html>
  );
}

Finally, add the CSS variable to your Tailwind CSS config:

tailwind.config.js
/** @type {import('tailwindcss').Config} */
module.exports = {
  content: ['./app/**/*.{js,ts,jsx,tsx}'],
  theme: {
    extend: {
      fontFamily: {
        sans: ['var(--font-inter)']
      },
    },
  },
  plugins: [],
};

You can now use the font-sans utility class to apply the font to your elements.

Preloading

When a font function is called on a page of your site, it is not globally available and preloaded on all routes. Rather, the font is only preloaded on the related route/s based on the type of file where it is used:

  • if it's a unique page, it is preloaded on the unique route for that page
  • if it's a layout, it is preloaded on all the routes wrapped by the layout
  • if it's the root layout, it is preloaded on all routes

Reusing fonts

Every time you call the localFont or Google font function, that font is hosted as one instance in your application. Therefore, if you load the same font function in multiple files, multiple instances of the same font are hosted. In this situation, it is recommended to do the following:

  • Call the font loader function in one shared file
  • Export it as a constant
  • Import the constant in each file where you would like to use this font

Next Steps